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Whose History is it Anyway? Empowering Communities of Color to Identify & Preserve Their Own Stories

2021-06-23

Recently, the field of historic preservation has been making efforts to address its origins in predominantly white communities while also recognizing the importance of preserving the diverse American narrative. Preservationists have expressed concerns about the underrepresentation of communities of color in the National Register of Historic Places and the significant loss of properties that reflect the stories of indigenous communities and people of color throughout America. Despite increased awareness, the question remains: how effective have initiatives been in planning for the long-term preservation of stories and places significant to people of color? Amidst the well-meaning enthusiasm, have preservationists truly prioritized amplifying the voices of community members and involving them in sharing their own narratives? Whose history is being preserved in the process? A webinar held on June 23, 2021, showcased endeavors to preserve stories and locations linked to Arizona's diverse ethnic heritage. The event featured discussions on ongoing efforts to safeguard these narratives and places within the state and beyond, utilizing innovative approaches to overcome obstacles hindering the complete storytelling. The day commenced with a keynote address by Dr. Eduardo Obregón Pagán from Arizona State University, followed by presentations and testimonials from individuals throughout the state, concluding with an engaging panel discussion aimed at educating, motivating, and empowering participants to document the histories of their respective communities.


To view the YouTube video, please click on the following link:

Whose History is it Anyway? Empowering Communities of Color to Identify & Preserve Their Own Stories
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